Why Spring Boot?

The Java Spring Boot framework provides a powerful set of tools for web development on both the front-end and back-end. It has built-in configuration for security and database access, as well as simple request mappings. This framework is highly configurable and makes web development extremely simple.

Why MongoDB?

Mongo is quickly growing in popularity among NoSQL databases. Read more about NoSQL and its benefits here . MongoDB, specifically, is perfect for developing a REST API with Spring Boot for a couple of key reasons:

  • Data is stored in MongoDB as JSON
  • Spring Boot provides a powerful MongoDB connector

Tools Used in this Tutorial

  1. Java2. Spring Boot3. Maven4. MongoDB5. Postman

Step 1: Creating a Database

This tutorial assumes that you already have an accessible instance of MongoDB that you can connect to. For more information on getting started with MongoDB, visit their online tutorial .
Let us start by creating a test database. I will call mine “rest_tutorial” using the following command in the MongoDB shell, or through a database manager like MongoDB Compass :


use rest_tutorial;

This will create a new database in MongoDB that we can use for our tutorial.

Step 2: Adding a MongoDB Collection and Data

In MongoDB, collections are analogous to tables in a relational database — they hold the data that we will be querying using our REST API. I will be creating a sample collection that will hold data about different types of pets. Let’s create the collection with the following command:


db.createCollection(“pets”);

Once the collection is created, we need to add some data! This collection will hold the names, breeds, and species of various pets, so a single document would be formatted as follows:


{
“name” : “Spot”,
“species” : “dog”,
“breed” : “pitbull”
}

We can add data to the collection with the following command:


db.pets.insertMany([
{
“name” : “Spot”,
“species” : “dog”,
“breed” : “pitbull”
},
{
“name” : “Daisy”,
“species” : “cat”,
“breed” : “calico”
},
{
“name” : “Bella”,
“species” : “dog”,
“breed” : “australian shepard”
}
]);

Querying the collection with db.pets.find({}); reveals that MongoDB automatically assigns a unique _id field to each document to make it easier to find and edit documents.

Using Spring Initializr to Create a Project

Spring offers a tool called the Spring Initializr to help jump-start your Spring Boot project. Access the Initializr at start.spring.io , and enter the following information:

  • Group: This is the package nameExample: com.example.gtommee
  • Artifact: This is the project nameExample: rest_tutorial
  • Dependencies: These are the features that will be added to your project (remember, you can always add these later) Our tutorial will use the “Web” and “MongoDB” dependencies

Then click Generate Project to download a .zip file with the basic project structure.

Adding Model to Spring Boot Project

With the project downloaded from the Spring Initializr, you can now open it in your favorite IDE to begin editing the project. First, we will want to add a pets model, so that Spring will know what kind of data the database will return. We can do this by creating a new folder in src/main/java/[package name]/ called “models”. In the new “models” folder, we can create a file called Pets.java . This Java class will hold the basic structure of a document in the “pets” collection, so the class looks as follows

“`

package com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial.models;
“`


import org.bson.types.ObjectId;
import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;

“`
public class Pets {
@Id
public ObjectId _id;

public String name;
public String species;
public String breed;

// Constructors
public Pets() {}

public Pets(ObjectId id, String name, String species, String breed) {
this.
id = _id;
this.name = name;
this.species = species;
this.breed = breed;
}

// ObjectId needs to be converted to string
public String getid() { return _id.toHexString(); }
public void set
id(ObjectId id) { this.id = _id; }

public String getName() { return name; }
public void setName(String name) { this.name = name; }

public String getSpecies() { return species; }
public void setSpecies(String species) { this.species = species; }

public String getBreed() { return breed; }
public void setBreed(String breed) { this.breed = breed; }
}
“`

The @Id annotation tells spring that the _id field will be used as the primary identifier. The rest of the class contains the basic constructors, getters, and setters for the Pets object.

Adding Repository to Spring Boot Project

Now that we have a model that identifies the data structure stored in the database to Spring Boot, we can create the connector between the model and MongoDB. This is done through a Repository interface. We can create this first by making a new folder called “repositories” in src/main/java/[package name]/ .
In the new “repositories” folder, we can create a file called PetsRepository.java . The name of this repository is extremely important because it tells MongoDB the collection that it will be querying (in this case, the pets collection). This interface will extend the MongoRepository class, which already contains generic methods like save (for creating/updating documents) and delete (for removing documents), but we will need to specify additional methods ourselves.
Luckily, we do not need to manually implement these queries, we can simply use Spring Boot’s repository naming conventions, and the MongoRepository will intelligently construct the queries at runtime. This means that our interface will be extremely simple, as follows:


package com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial.repositories;


import com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial.models.Pets;
import org.bson.types.ObjectId;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.repository.MongoRepository;


public interface PetsRepository extends MongoRepository<Pets, String> {
Pets findBy_id(ObjectId _id);
}

Adding the MongoDB Connection Info

To tell Spring the connection information for our MongoDB, we will need to add conection details to the application.properties file, located in the “src/main/resources” folder. Add the following lines to the file, replacing the information in brackets with the information specific to your MongoDB instance:


spring.data.mongodb.host=[host]
spring.data.mongodb.port=[port]
spring.data.mongodb.authentication-database=[authentication_database]
spring.data.mongodb.username=[username]
spring.data.mongodb.password=[password]
spring.data.mongodb.database=rest_tutorial

This is all the information that Spring will need to connect to the database.

Creating REST Controller

Spring should now be able to connect to MongoDB, so now we can establish the enpoints that we can contact to interact with the database. This will be done in a Spring Rest Controller, which uses Request Mappings to map requests with functions. We can create a Rest Controller by adding a file called PetsController.java to the src/main/java/[package name]/ folder. The basic file structure will look as follows:


package com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial;


import com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial.models.Pets;
import com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial.repositories.PetsRepository;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
import javax.validation.Valid;
import java.util.List;


@RestController
@RequestMapping(“/pets”)
public class PetsController {
@Autowired
private PetsRepository repository;
}

The @RestController annotation tells Spring that this class will requested by URL and will return data to the requester. The @RequestMapping annotation specifies the base URL that the controller will be handling, so any request to the host starting with “/pets” will be directed to this controller. The @Autowired annotation creates an instance of the PetsRepository object that will allow us to access and modify the pets database.

Adding the REST Endpoints

All of the following enpoints will be added directly into the PetsController class.

GET


@RequestMapping(value = “/”, method = RequestMethod.GET)
public List<Pets> getAllPets() {
return repository.findAll();
}

“`
@RequestMapping(value = “/{id}”, method = RequestMethod.GET)
public Pets getPetById(@PathVariable(“id”) ObjectId id) {
return repository.findBy_id(id);
}

“`

The first mapping takes any GET requests to the host with a URL of /pets/ and maps them to the getAllPets() method, which requests all documents from the pets collection.
The second mapping takes and GET requests to the host with a URL of /pets/ followed by an ObjectId and maps them to the getPetById() method, which searches the pets collection for the document with an _id field equal to the ObjectId in the URL.

PUT


@RequestMapping(value = “/{id}”, method = RequestMethod.PUT)
public void modifyPetById(@PathVariable(“id”) ObjectId id, @Valid
@RequestBody Pets pets) {
pets.set_id(id);
repository.save(pets);
}

This mapping expects a request body (in JSON format) with each of the fields that a Pets object contains ( name , species , and breed ). The id in the request URL is the _id of the document to be modified.

POST


@RequestMapping(value = “/”, method = RequestMethod.POST)
public Pets createPet(@Valid @RequestBody Pets pets) {
pets.set_id(ObjectId.get());
repository.save(pets);
return pets;
}

This mapping expects a request body (in JSON format) with each of the fields that a Pets object contains ( name , species , and breed ), and assigns it a new ObjectId. This object is then inserted into the pets collection, and the new Pets object is returned.

DELETE

“`
@RequestMapping(value = “/{id}”, method = RequestMethod.DELETE)
public void deletePet(@PathVariable ObjectId id) {
repository.delete(repository.findBy_id(id));
}

“`

This endpoint takes the _id of a document in the pets collection and removes that document from the collection.

Completed Controller


package com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial;
import com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial.models.Pets;
import com.example.gtommee.rest_tutorial.repositories.PetsRepository;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
import javax.validation.Valid;
import java.util.List;

“`
@RestController
@RequestMapping(“/pets”)
public class PetsController {
@Autowired
private PetsRepository repository;

@RequestMapping(value = “/”, method = RequestMethod.GET)
public List getAllPets() {
return repository.findAll();
}
“`

“`
@RequestMapping(value = “/{id}”, method = RequestMethod.GET)
public Pets getPetById(@PathVariable(“id”) ObjectId id) {
return repository.findBy_id(id);
}

@RequestMapping(value = “/{id}”, method = RequestMethod.PUT)
public void modifyPetById(@PathVariable(“id”) ObjectId id, @Valid @RequestBody Pets pets) {
pets.set_id(id);
repository.save(pets);
}

@RequestMapping(value = “/”, method = RequestMethod.POST)
public Pets createPet(@Valid @RequestBody Pets pets) {
pets.set_id(ObjectId.get());
repository.save(pets);
return pets;
}

@RequestMapping(value = “/{id}”, method = RequestMethod.DELETE)
public void deletePet(@PathVariable ObjectId id) {
repository.delete(repository.findBy_id(id));
}
}
“`

Testing Your API

Now that the controller has all of our endpoints, we can begin testing our API! From the command line, in the project root, run the mvn spring-boot:run command to compile the code and start the Spring server with the default port 8080.
Once the server starts, you are free to test your API however you choose.

POST ‘http://localhost:8080/pets’

With body : {“name” : “Liam”, “species” : “cat”, “breed” : “tabby”} and header : Content-Type: application/json
Returns:


{
“_id”: “5aecef5b6d55754834124df3”,
“name”: “Liam”,
“species”: “cat”,
“breed”: “tabby”
}

PUT ‘http://localhost:8080/pets/5aecef5b6d55754834124df3

With body : {“name” : “Liam”, “species” : “cat”, “breed” : “siamese”} and header : Content-Type : application/json
Returns:


empty response

GET ‘http://localhost:8080/pets/5aecef5b6d55754834124df3’

Returns:


{
“_id”: “5aecef5b6d55754834124df3”,
“name”: “Liam”,
“species”: “cat”,
“breed”: “siamese”
}

DELETE ‘http://localhost:8080/pets/5aecef5b6d55754834124df3’

Returns:


empty response

GET ‘http://localhost:8080/pets’

Returns:


[
{
“_id”: “5aeccb0a18365ba07414356c”,
“name”: “Spot”,
“species”: “dog”,
“breed”: “pitbull”
},
{
“_id”: “5aeccb0a18365ba07414356d”,
“name”: “Daisy”,
“species”: “cat”,
“breed”: “calico”
},
{
“_id”: “5aeccb0a18365ba07414356e”,
“name”: “Bella”,
“species”: “dog”,
“breed”: “australian shepard”
}
]

Future Articles

Now you have created a REST API using Java Spring Boot and MongoDB! In future articles, I will explain how to add additional features to your API, such as authentication! I will list the articles here as they become availible.

This content was originally published here.